Daniel Robert Elfman

♫ Danny Elfman

Category:Music artists

Rating:

  • Genre:
  • Music By:
  • Released:
  • Time:
  • Tagline:  

Danny Elfman is a famous score creator known for his passion to mix digital sounds and orchestral music (the brightest example is an opening sequence in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, 2005). The artist was born in Los Angeles. His talent to music creation was undiscovered till early 1970s when Danny visited Paris and started a music group together with his elder brother. The brothers are believed to have given birth to a new musical genre – intelligent rock. Danny has always revealed his interest to combination of orchestral music, classic chords and electronic sounds. This feature was the most distinctively felt in his solo album the So Lo released in 1984. His film scoring career started in 1980 when the ambitious artists created score for his brother directed film Forbidden Zone. Meeting then still unknown film director Tim Burton gave a new spin to the career of Danny Elfman. The young Elfman the continued to work with his group Oingo Boingo writing music and songs and started a new round of film scoring in his career.

Danny Elfman is most known for his works for movie industry and popular TV shows while only few of his fans do know about his vocal performance and solo album. The movie project that opened the greatest opportunity for Danny was born in Burton-Elfman tight cooperation – the Batman flicks. This cooperation resulted in all movies by Burton scored by Elfman. Danny did not compose only for Ed Wood of 1994. Elfman wrote great scores for Hannibal movies as the Silence of the Lambs (1991) and the red Dragon (2002) Today Danny is considered to be the hottest movie composer in the Hollywood. It was him who created the main title sounds for the Simpsons. The popular Desperate Housewives theme was also born in his mind.

The composer was nominated for 4 Academy Awards and his Batman theme won Grammy and his Desperate Housewives score won Emmy Award.



Related News:
comments powered by HyperComments